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industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
elsewhere. alaska is not hospitable environment. ed markey is running nomnation in liberal state. picking up green group nominations. that same day the league of conservation voters. i think more about that, than anything else. for him to be shocked people respond to tax policy is itself shocking. melissa: if you tax something, it is meant to discourage whatever behavior that is. shell responded and said while we're aware of the tax environment wherever we operate the driver for our operational decisions is going to be governed by safety. the tax policy in question i would add, by the way is that they were think of drilling on the outer continental shelf, there you would pay regular federal corporate income tax of 35%. otherwise, they were paying the alaska production tax which can be as high as 75%. i say if they were moving it for tax reasons they should just own it and get out in front of it. what is wrong with that? so you're moving it to go drill in a spot or keep it in a spot that is going to provide a better tax environment for you. this is company. isn't that what they're supposed to
. you look at this kind of environment where i would say that investment decisions are not so easy to make. we have a really low interest rate environment, and if you look at these companies that are woven into the fabric of our lives, companies that are going to benefit from strength in america or otherwise, and they're paying you a better dividend yield than the so-called risk-free rate of return, you might be ok. > it's almost a bet on the economy i would dare say. matt, good to have you on the show. > > thank you. time for us to sail out of here for today. coming up tomorrow: traders unplugged! find out if our trading pros think amazon stock is the next apple. from all of us at first business, have a terrific thursday!
? when we come back inside her >>> nothing made sense in the environment that i lived in, in the world that i lived in. it was insanity. >> august 30, 1994, bobbi parker, wife of the deputy warden at a prison in oklahoma, said she found herself in texas with a convicted killer. randolph dial, serving a life sentence, had broken out of prison and escaped in the parker van. and he took bobbi with him. she says she's not sure how it happened. that he may have drugged her. and he had a knife. >> i just respect remember -- i just remember at some point there was blood on me. blood on my arm, on my leg. and dial wanted to get those covered. he took me to a store, bought a few items, and i was able to make a phone call. >> later, some would find it odd bobbi called her mother, not her husband at the prison. she says she was happy to be calling anyone. >> making a phone call to me of a good thing because i was hoping it could be traced. >> back in granite, bobbi's husband randy was coming to terms with the fact that his wife was missing and so was a convicted murderer. >> it's just mind-numbin
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through e woods d you hearhe crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impact us into the fut
environment? >> i will say the film most like the political environment nowadays, of all of the ones that came out whether they were nominated or not was paranormal 4. because it is weird and just keeps happening over and over again. >> jennifer: i think it totally is listen kohn because people put him on a pedestal that stuck to his guns. and he did stick to his guns but he had to roll up his sleeves and do some of the horse trading that had to be done to get the horse trade done. >> yes the issue was not black and white, and there were so many things behind the scenes someone willing to flog through the mud in order to have the ends justify the means, and always along the way tell some pretty hilarious stories. >> stephanie: yeah for sure. so what is the best film that you would recommending of all of these for political junkies? what had you on the edge of your seat? >> it's tough because of the films that were nominated this year, a lot of them we knew what happened in the end. lincoln, you know they end up passing the 14th amendment. we know -- if you read
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
think they represent necessarily the average parent who i think would prefer an environment where their child wasn't exposed to that kind of risk. >> vice president biden of course is working really hard at this and is meeting with a lot of groups. and speaking of federal law, would you be more comfortable if this was a federal law that would make it so that public schools could not have teachers who were armed or do you believe that should be up to the local districts? >> i think this needs to be a national consensus. i think we need a federal law on that. i don't -- i don't believe that -- if you create anomalous environments where those things are available, you have too much bleed thru, i think we need to have consistency across this. parents should feel comfortable regardless of where they live. >> rhonda, has there been any student reaction to this? what is their takeaway knowing the teachers in their schools may be secretly armed? >> well, i mean, you used the word "secretly." but we do have, as was mentioned, the law in the entire state of utah. and the bottom line is we a
, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. take your camera and be prepared to
in every school is something that will enhance the learning environment, and that's our first responsibility inside of school, is the learning environment. you don't want to make this an armed camp for kids. i don't think that's a positive example for children. we should be able to figure out some other ways to enhance safety. >> new jersey governor chris christie. my next guest says armed guards are exactly what american schools need. in the wake of sandy hook elementary school massacre, sheriff joe arpaio has called for armed volunteers to patrol about 50 schools in his jurisdiction. welcome to you, sheriff. >> how are you doing, piers? >> explain to me why you believe that the answer to these gun massacres is to have a lot more guns. >> well, you know, i'm not going to get into that. we have many, many laws pertaining to guns already. we ought to enforce those laws, but i'm taking immediate action. i have a volunteer posse made up of 3,500 armed, well trained, 100 hours of training. we just finished another program at the malls. very successful. so why not utilize and mobil
.s.s., perhaps should be funded by the space operations budget. we're in a challenging budget environment. fiscal realities demand that nasa become more efficient. consensus has to be established among agency stakeholders, and also to clarify nasa's strategic vision, goals, and mission. the good work that nasa has done and that nasa can do in the future is so very important to me, and to everyone here in this room. i want to preserve our international space station. it is not likely with this electorate than we can expect to go to mars until people can go to the grocery store. it is about the economy. the economy has to improve. i want to work together to insure the american people can get the kind of results that nasa is capable of producing. we have a distinguished panel of witnesses today. this should spark much-needed national dialogue about nasa's future. the group is uniquely qualified to start this important discussion by sharing their own perspective about the strategic direction of america's space program. that concludes my remarks. i now recognize mrs. johnson for her opening statement.
it's had a tremendous year in production, but the political and security environment there remains very challenging. dagen: any other countries, saudi arabia, even the united states with its increasing production here that can make up any loss that we might see in iraq, like is there any cushion anywhere else in the world? >> well, you know, when you look at, you know, where we can see potentially within opec, the saudis are the ones who have their capacity. it becomes an interesting what the saudis will do in terms if we did see losses coming out of iraq. right now we've seen iraqi exports down 10% in december but have not seen a major attack on a facility. for now i think everyone is in sort of wait and see mode. another country you want to watch though is libya. libyan production has been another country that has allowed us to absorb the loss of iranian exports. you do want to watch, do we see any potential problems in libya? that's a country where the security situation does not remain very stable. dagen: thank you. >> thank you for having me. happy new year. connell: let's mov
, patty murray, borba boxer, chair of the environment. we have seven women now on the democratic side that are ranking members, and on the republican sign, every major committee is led by a white mail. in -- white male. in fact there's only one woman chairing a minor committee, and they fav her administration. what does this mean? women's leadership changes the conversation at these negotiations tables. there's a story of serving on the house armed services committee, and when they were talking about military reddiness, she and women like gabby giffords were there to ask questions about personnel and supplies, but also about mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. all of which is important for military readiness. and so you can't tell me that if we had two or three women involved in this fiscal cliff debate in the last month, that we wouldn't have gotten it done faster. i was at home over the holidays with my dad, and we all knew where we would end up. there were going to be tax increases. may have been at 300,000 or 4 hon thousand. there wasn't an american i
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
on some gun measures. what's clear here is the political environment in washington, we've seen over the last several months, how it's been very difficult to get movement on anything that goes down to the wire for lawmakers to come up with some sort of bipartisan agreement. what the vice president is spelling out here, is floating, essentially he's talking about the reality of the current political climate here in washington. yes, there are things that can be done legislatively. but if those things can't be done, then the president is willing to act alone. why? because he says it's time to act no now. >> i want to make it clear that we are not going to get caught up in the notion, unless we can do everything we'll do nothing. it's critically important that we act. >> in addition to these meetings that you spelled out earlier that the vice president is holding today, yesterday he also met with some faith leaders. they talked about the moral imperative to act quickly. he also had a conference call with governors, other stated and local officials across the country. they're really tryin
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
campaigning for the environment. he says becoming a grandparent just makes that more important. he also says he worries every night because his sons don't just honor the military, they serve in it. in a rare interview, prince charles says he feels he will have to answer to his royal grandchild on the state of the environment. >> you are soon to be a grandfather for the first time, so many congratulations. >> i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild, why didn't you do something? it makes it even more obvious to try to make sure that we leave them something that isn't a total -- >> reporter: environmental causes, something he shared with his children, growing organic vegetables on his farm and recently had an endangered frog named after him. >> we present you with a frog. >> reporter: but prince charles heir to the throne is also a military parent. immediate worry is prince harry serving as an apache helicopter pilot in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-411-7040 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>. >> neil: wall street is on chopping block, morgan stanley ready to slash its work force. >> well it's general trend on wall street. factoring in the fiscal cliff, deal they cut was crummy. higher taxes, trick on investors. wall street is continue to slow. it's reported two weeks ago. citigroup was first to announce big cuts and we reported at the time that morgan stanley was considering it. fox news business network beat all the competition including our friends across the river whose name begins with a "c" by about an hour. >> neil: i so admire that. [ laughter ] >> what is interesting you went downhill within minutes? >> i did. >> you went from a war hero to a pawn. [ laughter ] >> neil: let me get your sense of whether this coul
-- a hospital operating room so they would have to have the ventilation system for a sterile environment even though one is not needed to perform an abortion. they would have to have regulated widths for hallways and doors for abortion clinics. and this is another one that is rather interesting, there would be a minimum number of parking spaces required for abortion clinics. so these are all sort of the nitpicky ways that conservatives have used, you know, local laws, state laws, to restrict a woman's right to access to preventative care. >> and, you know, maria teresa, to jonathan's point, many of these clinics that so upset social conservatives offer, as you know, a wide variety of health service. for instance, screenings for various kinds of cancer. what is it about helping often poor single women that so upsets conservatives? >> well, i think you hit the nail on the head, martin. the conservative folks going after a woman's right to choose, and it's the extreme right, they are basically talking both sides of their mouth. at the same time they don't want preventative care. they don't want
around? >> i believe the atmosphere has changed. the environment u i think there's a good chance that we can push a positive agenda forward. if this doesn't do it, if this newtown tragedy doesn't do it, i'm not sure what will. we just need to search our hearts and our souls and ask if there's not more we can do to prevent this sort of thing. and i think most mirns sense that. most americans are willing to think about some new ways of approaching this. of course, we need some political leadership and some leaders to encourage us to come together on this. >> congressman, you're from north carolina and polling says that the public is understanding it is moving toward more of a sensible gun control kind of country. but what about your colleagues in the congress? are you hearing or sensing any movement there? one of their colleagues was shot and we didn't see any movement there. why should we feel something would be different this time? >> well, i have to say that congress is more polarized and more stuck on talking points than i've ever seen in my time there. but i do believe if you just sto
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problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
it is that they have no intention of doing, anyway. basically, we live in an environment where things are going to continue to change and businesses are going to feel money if they feel there's an end demand that justifies that. there's end demand in china, end demand globally and moderate end demand in the u.s. the reality is businesses have done relatively well for the last two or three years and will continue to. >> real quickly, herbalife later this week will be making a big presentation trying to defend itself from bill ackmann. your thoughts? >> look, i happen to feel that waging your short selling campaign on the air waves a way of dictating stock price, i am personally uncomfortable with. i think it's the wrong way to go about investing because it raises all these questions of are you making a legitimate analysis of the underlying business of the company or are you trying to shift the momentum in order to make money off the stock direction? >> you don't think that bill ackmann is going out, and then selling without us knowing? >> no, i don't believe that. i just don't think that's the
feinstein, chairman of intelligence, patty murray, chair budget. barbara boxer, chair of the environment. seven women for ranking members on the house committee. on the republican side? every major committee is led by a white male. in fact there is only one woman sharing a minor committee in the house. so, what does this mean? does it really matter? it changes the conversation that the negotiation table. senator gillibrand often tells the story of serving on the armed services committee. when they were talking about military readiness, she and women like daddy giffords were there to rest questions about personnel and mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. you cannot tell me that if we had two or three women involved in the fiscal cliff debate over the last month that we would not have gotten through it faster. i was at home over the hollow eyes with my father. we knew where we would end up. we knew that there would be tax increases. but women just want to get these things done and keep moving forward. these republican men, john boehner in particular, tend to wa
with dividends in a zero interest rate environment. cheryl: forget bonds and other alternative investments, stocks really are the only option at this point? >> well, it's got to be a part of the portfolio. cheryl: a bigger piece? >> yeah, a bigger piece. have some cash with scares and shocks along the way. at some point, if the economy does continue to grow, people worry about when is the fed going to take the punch bowl away, and that worries people. you have a risk of something happening in europe, the middle east is a mess, and so there's a lot of reasons to have a little bit of cash, but if you have a return, an absolute return in the environment, large cap multinationals have to be a part of it. cheryl: thank you very much. good to see you. >> thank you. cheryl: well, the next fight between congress and president obama will be over two controversial cabinet selections coming down in an hour from now. rich edson joining me from inside the beltway with the latest on the two picks from the president. rich? >> well, cheryl, the headline here, according to white house officials, senator ch
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
cars hurt the environment. science to push their agenda. .e choosing advil® because helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's america's #1 selling pain reliever. you took action, you took advil®. and we thank you. with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes, and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>eric: extreme weather in jerusalem. the holy land getting a rare snowstorm that paralyzed the city. eight inches piling up on palm trees and streets. it's been over a decade since the last snowfall in the city. michael j. fox is ready for a comeback. he says his parkinson's is under control and he'll be returning to a new tv show where he plays a character who has parkinson's. >>alisyn: some people believe their environmental plans are scientifically sound but are they ignoring evidence when it does not back up their agenda? hank campbell is the founder of science 2.0 and cofounder of science left behind, feel-good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. let's talk about suppo
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
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